Heather's books

Sarah's Key
Room
Rainwater
The Help
A Heartbreaking Work of Staggering Genius
Charlie and the Chocolate Factory
Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets
New Moon
Eclipse
Breaking Dawn
Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows
The Lightning Thief
Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix
Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince
Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire
Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban
The Notebook
Eat, Pray, Love
The Time Traveler's Wife
Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone


Heather's favorite books »

Monday, August 1, 2016

not worthy of the Teens' Top Ten nomination

You and Me and Him

You and Me and Him

By: Kris Dinnison

Genre: YA LGBTQ

Pages: 288

Published: 2015

Read: July

2 out of 5



Pretty in Pink 2015?  The entire book reminded me of this great 1980’s movie, but that was its only good quality. There is a vintage record store with a gay (It IS 2015) owner, a poor employee and friend, and a love triangle. Of course, this love triangle included a gay guy, but he was still quirky. What I didn’t like…all the characters! The main character, Maggie, did nothing wrong but felt guilty about everything. Her gay best friend hated her because she liked the new kid (who wasn’t even gay). The new kid was a totally player…I didn’t understand why anyone would want him anyway. Everyone thought he was just friendly versus a totally jerk. Of course, in the end they lived happily ever after! Maybe I needed to be a teen girl to LOVE this book, but I felt it sucked.

Tuesday, July 12, 2016

I am done with Jenny Lawson...

Furiously Happy: A Funny Book About Horrible Things

Furiously Happy

By: Jennifer Lawson

Genre: Biography/humor

Pages: 329

Published: 2015

Audiobook: 7 cd’s (8 hours and 20 minutes)

Read: July

1 out of 5



This book was incredibly stupid. SO...why did I keep listening? In hopes it would get better – there are a lot of great reviews. Lawson’s stories were just plain stupid, not funny and completely exaggerated. These supposedly aren’t made up stories – it is marketed as a memoir- which makes it that much worse. I found that only 3 or 4 were believable and funny. Plus, she would go on long tangents that didn’t make sense at all. Even though not worth the 8 hours of listening, I did enjoy the very last chapter – although not funny or intended that way - hearing how her blog has helped people with their mental illness was inspiring…some people must get her humor just not me.  

Thursday, July 7, 2016

Once a upon a Crime Family

Hold Me Like a Breath by Tiffany Schmidt

Hold Me Like a Breath

By: Tiffany Schmidt

Genre: YA fantasy/Sci-Fi

Pages: 390

Published: 2015

Read: July

4 out of 5



Penelope’s family works in an illegal business – the selling of body parts. She has known this her entire life. Even in this business her family can’t save her from her disease – an autoimmune disorder that causes her to bruise A LOT. Then again, they can’t even save themselves. Schmidt writes an amazing roller coaster of a story that continues throughout as Penelope fights for her life not knowing who to trust. I can’t wait to read the next book in series. I am intrigued by the underlying storyline that her father insists that Penelope is essentially to the Family business. I hope that develops in the next book. Schmidt is well deserving of the TTT nomination. 

Friday, July 1, 2016

Not a good TTT nomination

The Game of Love and Death

The Game of Love and Death

By: Martha Brockenbrough

Genre: YA Historical Fiction

Pages: 329

Published: 2015

Read: June

1 out of 5



The premise of this story sounds very interesting – Immortals, Love and Death, choose individuals to play a game and see if death occurs or they fall in love. However, the storyline quickly goes downhill. Love and Death have the ability to change into different characters at any given times which means there are a lot of characters to follow and makes it difficult to track. I also felt the game, even though short in length, did not have enough action to keep the reader’s attention. I wanted the game to have a more adventurous ride.  Not only did I not like this book, I am shocked that it was nominated for the Teens’ Top Ten this year. I read a lot of YA books published in 2015 that are way more deserving of the nomination. I hope that some of my teens will read this book, so I can hear their take.

Monday, June 20, 2016

Teens's Top Ten Nominee

Every Last Word by Tamara Ireland Stone

Every Last Word

By: Tamara Ireland Stone

Genre: YA Realistic Fiction

Pages: 368

Published: 2015

Read: June

4 out of 5



This book is well deserving of a nomination for Teens’ Top Ten for 2015. Stone was very creative, but factual at the same time with a serious topic. I would have loved a secret place to hide in high school. I was never considered an outcast, but was definitely a quieter teen and what teenager couldn’t use an escape?  Sam is the kind of character you can’t help but feel for and want to befriend. This book would also lead to great discussions for book clubs, both for teens and adults. Mental illness is definitely a hot topic for YA fiction novels and can be redundant, but I feel Stone did thorough research and takes a different angle with this book. I would highly recommend reading the author notes at the end of book and maybe even before you start the book. If I had done that I would have read the book in a little different light. 

Monday, June 13, 2016

Best Read of 2016 (thus far)....

A Boy Made of Blocks

A Boy Made of Blocks

By: Keith Stuart

Genre: Adult Fiction

Pages: 400

Published: 2016

Read: June

5 out of 5

I wanted to read this book because I have a stepson with ADHD who is obsessed with Minecraft. I thought it may be a good book. Boy, was I wrong - It was an amazing book! A father has a difficult time understanding and communicating with his son, Sam, a 10 year old with autism. It's through the game, Minecraft, that Alex is able to enter his son's world and learn how Sam works. Not only is this book inspirational, but it also teaches us that not all video games are bad for children to play. While this is a fictional story, the author has his own autistic son, and it is evident that he writes not only with research, but also his own experiences. Anyone who has a child, works with someone, or knows someone with any type of learning disability MUST read this book! 

Monday, May 9, 2016

What a B....

Becoming Grandma by Lesley Stahl

Becoming Grandma

By: Lesley Stahl

Genre: Nonfiction/Autobiography

Pages: 288

Published: 2016

Read: May

1 out of 5


What I learned from this book - Stahl is an arrogant, nonrealistic, selfish women. Honestly, I only read about 50 pages I was so disgusted with her views I could not read any more. Stahl states to her daughter, " ...you're going to breast-feed? Really? [I think] we had to prove we could do our jobs as well as -and just like- the men. They didn't breast-feed; we didn't breast-feed." As her daughter first struggles to breast-feed and seeks out a lactation consultant, she states "Ha! I thought. Taylor is calm and centered because I used a bottle!" I am proud of her daughter for not listening to her mom and continued to breast-feed. Some of her other ideas were to hire a maid, nanny, AND a financial assistant to help organize and pay their personal finances so Taylor could go back to her career and life. These are just a sample of her views; I was so appalled by what she openly admitted in her book. To Stahl, I must say - every day Grandma's cannot take their grandchildren to an Easter egg hunt to the White House - that is when I gave up!