Heather's books

Sarah's Key
Room
Rainwater
The Help
A Heartbreaking Work of Staggering Genius
Charlie and the Chocolate Factory
Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets
New Moon
Eclipse
Breaking Dawn
Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows
The Lightning Thief
Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix
Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince
Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire
Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban
The Notebook
Eat, Pray, Love
The Time Traveler's Wife
Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone


Heather's favorite books »

Monday, February 12, 2018

Take this review with a grain of salt

Thunderhead by Neal Shusterman

Thunderhead

By: Neal Shusterman

Genre: YA Dystopian

Pages: 504

Published: 2018

Read:  February

2 out of 5

I love Shusterman and I loved Scythe, but for some reason I personally could not get into Thunderhead. It was well written and continues the story of Citra and Rowen nicely, but for some reason I had a tough time getting into the storyline and found my mind wandered a lot. I think my lack of enjoyment was more my fault than Shusterman’s story telling. If you enjoyed Scythe, I still recommend reading Thunderhead. I have heard that some liked it better than Scythe, I just did not.



Monday, February 5, 2018

If you ever wondered about Iranian immigrants, read this book

Americanized by Sara Saedi

Americanized: A Rebel without a Green Card

By: Sara Saedi

Genre: YA Memoir

Pages: 288

Published: 2018

Read:  February

3 out of 5


This is a great memoir about an Iranian teen living in America without a green card. She went through her childhood without even knowing she was an illegal immigrant. Although not seemingly directly affected (she was still able to get a job), but the fear of being departed was always in the background. However, my favorite part was the Frequently Asked Questions added throughout the book. These weren’t directly related to her family, but Iranians in general. I thought this was very informative, while still being entertaining. I loved how the book was written in novel format, but still nonfiction. At first, one may not even realize it is nonfiction.

Sunday, January 28, 2018

Another empowering read...

Piecing Me Together

Piecing Me Together

By: Renee Watson

Genre: YA Realistic Fiction

Pages: 272

Published: 2017

Read:  January

3.5 out of 5

Jade is one of the few black students in a privileged high school which she attends on scholarship. She has few friends and desperately seeks to travel abroad with the school. She knows it is her only way out of her poor neighborhood. Instead she gets selected to be in a “woman-to-woman” group where she is paired with a mentor. Although this may be a great opportunity, her mentor isn’t as stable herself as she should be. Only with Jade’s determination and learning alongside her mentor makes this a powerful book. They both teach each other a lot about the outside world. Watson’s focus is on teaching the reader’s that you create your own future and that empowerment and standing up for oneself is as important as the opportunities one may receive

Thursday, January 25, 2018

An Empowering Book

Moxie

Moxie

By: Jennifer Mathieu

Genre: YA Realistic Fiction

Pages: 330

Published: 2017

Read:  January

4 out of 5


It isn’t often that you come across a book with such a strong female character. Viv is fed up with her school and especially the principal. Fed up with the sexist dress codes, sexual harassment, and a football team that can do no wrong and has the best of everything- equipment, uniforms, etc. So one night instead of going to the football game (which the entire town literally shuts down for), she single-handedly creates the Moxie zine. Moxie unites all the girls in the school to fight back. It takes off like rapid fire and soon the Moxie group is formed. This book is fun and entertaining while providing a great lesson in feminism. I feel this book will empower many teen readers. It is definitely a feel good book and will inspire all. Moxie Girls Fight Back!!!

Monday, January 8, 2018

Not the book for me...

Your Lie in April

Your Lie in April

By: Naoshi Arakawa

Genre: YA Manga

Pages: 224

Published: 2015

Read:  January

2 out of 5


This is the first manga I have read, so I will be the first to admit that I am probably not the best judge for this book (no good comparison). I felt the book jumped around and added too many unnecessary parts and YES, I read it from right to left. The story did pull me in immediately with the tragic death of Kosei’s parents and the resulting monotone view of his life. However, it seemed to jump around too much – in the cafĂ© buying food to playing with a cat to school being let out for no reason to riding their bikes away in the distance. I just couldn’t follow the side stories and didn’t understand why some aspects were even included (ex: not being able to buy food in their school uniform, WHAT?!?). It may be because I am an adult and a YA librarian, but I did appreciate the notes on Beethoven, Mozart, and music in general. I hope the teens do as well. 

Friday, January 5, 2018

Real or Imaginary. That is the question

Calvin by Martine Leavitt

Calvin

By: Martine Leavitt

Genre: YA Realistic Fiction

Pages: 181

Published: 2015

Read:  January

3 out of 5


Imaginary or Real? That is a tough question for a kid with schizophrenia. I believe it would even be tougher to write from the point-of-view of a person that has the disease. The main character, Calvin, tries to blame Bill Watterson, the creator of Calvin and Hobbes, for the fact that Hobbes, an imaginary tiger, talks to him. See, he was born on the day that Watterson released his very last comic of Calvin and Hobbes. AND then his parents named him Calvin! Throughout the book, Calvin is writing a letter to Mr. Watterson about his hike across Lake Erie to meet him. Along the travels, Calvin with Hobbes and school friend, Susie, the reader needs to decipher who is real and who generated by Calvin’s mind. Leavitt writes a story that leaves you guessing, but isn’t very personal. Maybe schizo individuals aren’t very personal? I felt this was just an okay story and do recommend for anyone who enjoys realistic, yet fictional stories about schizophrenia. However, there are many other YA novels on mental illnesses that are better and more character driven.

Tuesday, January 2, 2018

A boring adventure...

Dash & Lily's Book of Dares by Rachel Cohn

Dash & Lily’s Book of Dares

By: Rachel Cohn & David Levithan

Genre: YA Realistic Fiction

Pages: 260

Published: 2010

Audiobook: 6 hours and 40 mins

Read:  January

2.5 out of 5


This book sucked me in right away (4 stars). I love scavenger hunts AND books, so this was right up my alley. It was fast-paced and fun.  Dash find a little red moleskin notebook in a book store and that starts a trail of clues around town. However, once the two teenagers meet in person the book takes a turn for the worst. No longer interesting the book loses its enthusiasm and roller coaster of adventure. If the premise of an exciting mystical hunt around a town is what draws you to this book, Skip it. I would recommend this only to Cohn fans. Levithan has written much better books – pick up Will Grayson, Will Grayson instead.